10 Ways You Know It Was Written By Me


I read this over on Fangs, Fur, and Fey. It seemed cool and interesting, so here’s mine.

1) THERE ARE GUNS, LOTS AND LOTS OF GUNS.
Really, my books are pretty violent. I love guns and use them often in my writing. They are not the answer to everything, but when in doubt, shoot the damn thing.

2) THE MONSTERS ARE MONSTERS, DAMMIT.
It us against them folks. Humans against all the ooglies and the booglies. If you are a monster in my book then you will have no redeeming quality whatsoever. Evil is as evil does. No sensual, romantic, tortured monsters here, just evil on epic levels.

3) THE HERO IS LARGER THAN LIFE.
He just is. I am bigger than almost anyone you will ever meet (6’4, 340lbs). I relate to it. My hero will be bigger and stronger and faster, than a normal human.

4) THERE ARE MORE LYCANTHROPES THAN JUST WOLVES.
Any kind of animal can show up as a strain of lycanthropy. And shapeshifters covers a lot more than just lycanthropes. And lycanthropes are not always monsters, in fact, they are human the majority of their lives, at least they usually are.

5) ALL BETS ARE OFF AS TO WHO LIVES AND WHO DIES.
I’m with Joss Whedon in the that if noone ever dies then nothing matters. You can go into any fight without a sense of true danger and a lack of danger is boring. I kill my characters. They live in a deadly world after all.

6) IF YOU DIE IT WILL NOT BE BORING.
Again, my characters live in a world of fire, and blood, and monsters. Nobody dies in their sleep. Nobody dies of old age. In my book a death by gunshot is natural causes.

7) NO MATTER WHAT MYTHOLOGY I PULL FROM IT MUST FIT IN A WORLD WHERE GOD AND THE DEVIL ARE REAL.
Like it or don’t, I don’t care. The world I have built has a God and all that goes with it. My characters hold belief in God. Now, what that means for them is different that what you may have learned in sunday school.

8) MY WOMEN ARE HOT.
Just like the hero is larger than life, there are no plain women in my books. It is fantasy, and I am a man, and I know beautiful women exist in this world. I am married to one.

9) I WRITE FROM A MALE POINT OF VIEW.
I know a lot of this genre is written by women writers and has female main characters. Not me. I am a man, I am very male, and I write from a very male perspective. No it’s not degrading or demeaning to women, I wouldn’t do that to women. I wouldn’t write them as lesser. I’m actually referring not to relationships like that, but the way the main character veiws everything in his world, from other people, to conflict, to food, to his car. He’s not a barbarian or a brute, But at the end of the day, my main character will be a man because that is what I know.

10) MY BOOKS ARE SET IN THE SOUTH.
I was born and raised in the south. I love the south. Plus it gives me the freedom to write about monster truck driving vampires who live in trailer parks. White trash werewolves and zombies who survive on brains and grits. Sweet tea and country music are the fuel for my writing. Y’all come back now, but polish your crucifix before y’all do.

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9 Comments

  1. This was fun to read. “Plus it gives me the freedom to write about monster truck driving vampires who live in trailer parks” had me really chortling. Thanks for giving me a laugh today. It was much needed. πŸ™‚

  2. This was fun to read. “Plus it gives me the freedom to write about monster truck driving vampires who live in trailer parks” had me really chortling. Thanks for giving me a laugh today. It was much needed. πŸ™‚

  3. Re: Glad you like it.
    It was also interesting to see your perspective. We have a lot of common ground — 2 through 7 — but there are some points where we wildly diverge, and it’s interesting to see where. The guns thing particularly. There are almost no guns in either my urban fantasy or my scifi. None in my urban fantasy because there’s lots of magic and I’ve never understood the point of guns when most of the characters can stop bullets with a spell. But, then, Harry Dresden is usually packing, so it’s probably just me. None in my scifi because I figure we’ll have developed better weapons over the next 100 years (which has been fun to think about from a world-building perspective). My scifi characters are usually armed, but as the phased-light weapon packing cyborg character says, “not in the conventional sense.”
    8 and 9, well, you know, gender thing.
    10 is the old chestnut, “write what you know.” It may be an old chestnut, but I think it’s still very good advice, particularly when writing fantasy. Writing from what you know helps ground the fantasy in reality and makes it a lot more identifiable to the reader. I’ve been reading T A Pratt’s Marla Mason series (“Blood Engines” and “Poison Sleep”) recently. The first book is set in San Francisco, where I’ve been many times. The places were recognizable to me and provided a sense of familiarity from which the story could then leap into the fantastical without leaving me feeling adrift. The second book is set in “Felport,” a city that’s described in the first book as being “back east,” although it’s not recognizably any of the east coast US cities (at least, not one that I’ve been to). Felport is well-described in the second book, but it wasn’t familiar to me — there wasn’t anything I could immediately latch on to — and I did have that sense at times of being cast adrift. That sense hasn’t prevented me from liking the second book, but so far I like it less than the first, and I have to wonder if some of that is the setting.
    I write what I know in my urban fantasy, but my scifi, well, that’s tougher. I write what nobody knows. How to make that familiar and identifiable for the reader, well, I’m still working on that . . .

  4. Re: Glad you like it.

    It was also interesting to see your perspective. We have a lot of common ground — 2 through 7 — but there are some points where we wildly diverge, and it’s interesting to see where. The guns thing particularly. There are almost no guns in either my urban fantasy or my scifi. None in my urban fantasy because there’s lots of magic and I’ve never understood the point of guns when most of the characters can stop bullets with a spell. But, then, Harry Dresden is usually packing, so it’s probably just me. None in my scifi because I figure we’ll have developed better weapons over the next 100 years (which has been fun to think about from a world-building perspective). My scifi characters are usually armed, but as the phased-light weapon packing cyborg character says, “not in the conventional sense.”

    8 and 9, well, you know, gender thing.

    10 is the old chestnut, “write what you know.” It may be an old chestnut, but I think it’s still very good advice, particularly when writing fantasy. Writing from what you know helps ground the fantasy in reality and makes it a lot more identifiable to the reader. I’ve been reading T A Pratt’s Marla Mason series (“Blood Engines” and “Poison Sleep”) recently. The first book is set in San Francisco, where I’ve been many times. The places were recognizable to me and provided a sense of familiarity from which the story could then leap into the fantastical without leaving me feeling adrift. The second book is set in “Felport,” a city that’s described in the first book as being “back east,” although it’s not recognizably any of the east coast US cities (at least, not one that I’ve been to). Felport is well-described in the second book, but it wasn’t familiar to me — there wasn’t anything I could immediately latch on to — and I did have that sense at times of being cast adrift. That sense hasn’t prevented me from liking the second book, but so far I like it less than the first, and I have to wonder if some of that is the setting.

    I write what I know in my urban fantasy, but my scifi, well, that’s tougher. I write what nobody knows. How to make that familiar and identifiable for the reader, well, I’m still working on that . . .

  5. Re: Glad you like it.

    It was also interesting to see your perspective. We have a lot of common ground — 2 through 7 — but there are some points where we wildly diverge, and it’s interesting to see where. The guns thing particularly. There are almost no guns in either my urban fantasy or my scifi. None in my urban fantasy because there’s lots of magic and I’ve never understood the point of guns when most of the characters can stop bullets with a spell. But, then, Harry Dresden is usually packing, so it’s probably just me. None in my scifi because I figure we’ll have developed better weapons over the next 100 years (which has been fun to think about from a world-building perspective). My scifi characters are usually armed, but as the phased-light weapon packing cyborg character says, “not in the conventional sense.”

    8 and 9, well, you know, gender thing.

    10 is the old chestnut, “write what you know.” It may be an old chestnut, but I think it’s still very good advice, particularly when writing fantasy. Writing from what you know helps ground the fantasy in reality and makes it a lot more identifiable to the reader. I’ve been reading T A Pratt’s Marla Mason series (“Blood Engines” and “Poison Sleep”) recently. The first book is set in San Francisco, where I’ve been many times. The places were recognizable to me and provided a sense of familiarity from which the story could then leap into the fantastical without leaving me feeling adrift. The second book is set in “Felport,” a city that’s described in the first book as being “back east,” although it’s not recognizably any of the east coast US cities (at least, not one that I’ve been to). Felport is well-described in the second book, but it wasn’t familiar to me — there wasn’t anything I could immediately latch on to — and I did have that sense at times of being cast adrift. That sense hasn’t prevented me from liking the second book, but so far I like it less than the first, and I have to wonder if some of that is the setting.

    I write what I know in my urban fantasy, but my scifi, well, that’s tougher. I write what nobody knows. How to make that familiar and identifiable for the reader, well, I’m still working on that . . .

  6. Re: Glad you like it.

    It was also interesting to see your perspective. We have a lot of common ground — 2 through 7 — but there are some points where we wildly diverge, and it’s interesting to see where. The guns thing particularly. There are almost no guns in either my urban fantasy or my scifi. None in my urban fantasy because there’s lots of magic and I’ve never understood the point of guns when most of the characters can stop bullets with a spell. But, then, Harry Dresden is usually packing, so it’s probably just me. None in my scifi because I figure we’ll have developed better weapons over the next 100 years (which has been fun to think about from a world-building perspective). My scifi characters are usually armed, but as the phased-light weapon packing cyborg character says, “not in the conventional sense.”

    8 and 9, well, you know, gender thing.

    10 is the old chestnut, “write what you know.” It may be an old chestnut, but I think it’s still very good advice, particularly when writing fantasy. Writing from what you know helps ground the fantasy in reality and makes it a lot more identifiable to the reader. I’ve been reading T A Pratt’s Marla Mason series (“Blood Engines” and “Poison Sleep”) recently. The first book is set in San Francisco, where I’ve been many times. The places were recognizable to me and provided a sense of familiarity from which the story could then leap into the fantastical without leaving me feeling adrift. The second book is set in “Felport,” a city that’s described in the first book as being “back east,” although it’s not recognizably any of the east coast US cities (at least, not one that I’ve been to). Felport is well-described in the second book, but it wasn’t familiar to me — there wasn’t anything I could immediately latch on to — and I did have that sense at times of being cast adrift. That sense hasn’t prevented me from liking the second book, but so far I like it less than the first, and I have to wonder if some of that is the setting.

    I write what I know in my urban fantasy, but my scifi, well, that’s tougher. I write what nobody knows. How to make that familiar and identifiable for the reader, well, I’m still working on that . . .

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